Starting Monday, June 1st, our office will be open for routine care including eye exams and optical services. Per the Governor’s Executive order, you must wear a mask or face covering when you are in public and will need to have one on when entering our office. Prior to check-in, a member of our team will take your temperature, and ask you a series of COVID-19 questions adapted from the CDC. Please note, that guests or family members are asked to stay in their vehicles to further our efforts to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and to protect our staff and patients.

 

As always, we are available for emergency care 24/7.

 

If you need to reschedule your appointment or have further questions, please contact us at (630) 553-6166.

 

Curbside pick-up is still available during office hours at (630) 538-6571. Walk-ins welcome for Optical services.

 

We are currently not accepting cash payments in the office. Check, Credit, or Debit only.

 

Please visit our COVID-19 page for more detailed information and current hours of operation.

What Causes Dry Eyes?

Tears are comprised of three layers: oil, water, and mucus. Each layer plays a key role in keeping the eye lubricated. For example, the oil layer prevents the water layer from evaporating, while the mucin layer spreads tears evenly. Should any layer prove insufficient, it will result in eye dryness.

Factors such as age, gender, medications, and certain medical conditions can all affect your body’s ability to produce good quality tears. Even your environment can cause the water layer to evaporate too quickly. Just as there are multiple causes of dry eye, there are multiple kinds as well.

Evaporative dry eye is caused by a lack of oil in tears, resulting in the water layer evaporating too quickly. Aqueous deficient dry eye, on the other hand, is when tears do not contain enough water to keep eyes nourished. Which kind of dry eye you have will dictate which treatment you receive.

View Video